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Seminar

Seminar

Ad Hominem

in
Date: 
5 June, 2017 - 17:15 - 18:30

 

 

 

The second event in the 2017 Ad Hominem series features:

 

Dr Chris Bishop (School of Literature, Languages and Lingustics)

Dr Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller (School of Archaeology and Anthropology)

Dr Shameem Black (South Asia Research Institute)

 

Seminar | Dangerous Romances: The Stranger in Guwang yan 姑妄言, Preposterous Words

in
Date: 
30 May, 2017 - 16:30 - 17:45
Venue: 
Seminar Room 1, Sir Roland Wilson Building

 

Seminar | 'Whites, Blacks and Tawneys': Perceptions of Native Americans in the Early Modern Anglo-Atlantic

in
Date: 
23 May, 2017 - 16:30 - 17:45
Venue: 
Seminar Room 1, Sir Roland Wilson Building

 

It is widely accepted that the dominant medical paradigm in early modern England was humoral. On the basis of ancient authorities, indirectly Hippocrates and quintessentially Galen, human physiology was commonly believed to comprise four elemental fluids: the sanguine, choleric, phlegmatic, and melancholic humours – albeit in diverse combinations.

Ad Hominem #1

in
Date: 
1 May, 2017 - 17:15 - 18:30
Venue: 
Drawing Room, University House

 

 

 

The first event of the 2017 Ad Hominem series features:

 

Prof Lisa Kewley (ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics)

Dr Raihan Ismail (Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies)

Dr Maria Hynes (School of Sociology)

 

Ad Hominem

in

 

ad hominem

 

The Humanities Research Centre and University House are delighted to present the 2017 series of 'ad hominem'.

Seminar // Dr Adam Broinowski, March 21

in
Date: 
21 March, 2017 - 16:30 - 17:45
Venue: 
Seminar Room 1, Sir Roland Wilson Building

Ankoku butoh is an original Japanese dance form that emerged in the mid to late 1950s in Tokyo. Co-founded by Hijikata Tatsumi (1928–1986) and Ohno Kazuo (1906–2010), it was an artistic response to social conditions as the nation of Japan underwent radical shifts in Imperial Japan’s engagement in the Asia-Pacific war (1931–1945), defeat and US-led Occupation of Japan (1945–1952) and the US-Japan alliance formation within the cold war division system.

 
 

The Atomic Gaze and Occupied Bodies:

Performance in Japan during and after the Cold War

 

 

 

Dr Adam Broinowski

Australian National University

 

Tuesday 21 March 2017

4:30 – 5:45pm

Seminar Room 1, Sir Roland Wilson Building, ANU

 

Image: Kikuji Kawada, 'The A-Bomb Memorial Dome and Ohta River.' The Map. 1960-5.
 

Seminar // Prof Jane Simpson, March 14

in
Date: 
14 March, 2017 - 16:30 - 17:45
Venue: 
Seminar Room 1, Sir Roland Wilson Building

Any fiction writer creates an alternate world, but in some genres, the alternate world is intended to be different from the novelist’s own society. This is most noticeable in science fiction, historical novels, fantasy novels, steampunk, and novels set in non-English speaking countries.

 
 

Constrained Creativity:

Towards a Natural History of Language in Fantasy Novels

 

 

Professor Jane Simpson

Australian National University

 

Tuesday 14 March 2017

4.30 – 5.45pm

Seminar Room 1, Sir Roland Wilson Building, ANU

 

Image: 'The Mermaid.' Hans Anderson. (Illus.) Stories from Hans Andersen. Hodder and Stoughton. <gutenberg.org/ebooks/17860>.
 

Seminar // Prof Srilata Ravi, March 7

in
Date: 
7 March, 2017 - 16:30
Venue: 
Seminar Room 2/3, SRWB

In the last fifty years forced and unforced migrations have resulted in some of the greatest upheavals and displacements seen in history. Refugees, economic migrants, and political exiles have moved away from their geographical places of origin to settle in foreign places, carrying with them (in multiple forms and to different degrees) memories of their past, tensions in the present and aspirations for their future.

 

‘Out of Place’: Diasporic travel writing and the impossibility of return

 

 

Professor Srilata Ravi
University of Alberta, Canada

 

Tuesday 7 March 2017

4.30 – 5.30pm

Seminar Room 2/3, Sir Roland Wilson Building, ANU

 

HRC Seminar Series 2016, Prof Ian Balfour, 6 December

in
Date: 
6 December, 2016 - 16:15 - 17:30
Venue: 
HRC Conference Room, A.D. Hope Building #14

This talk looks into how language works in the discourse of the sublime, zeroing on the figure of inversion from Longinus to Milton’s Paradise Lost (read through Edmund Burke) to Friedrich Hölderlin and beyond.  Inversion emerges as a disruptive figure of speech poised between nature and culture and for that reason as a site of the political and even most particularly as a “figure of revolution,” as one rhetorician calls it.

 


 

 

Inversion: On Some Poetics and Politics in the
Discourse of the Sublime

 

 

Professor Ian Balfour
York University, Canada

 

Tuesday 6 December 2016

4.15 – 5.30pm

HRC Conference Room, A.D Hope Building, ANU

 

HRC Seminar Series 2016, Prof Ethan Kleinberg, 5 December

in
Date: 
5 December, 2016 - 16:15 - 17:30
Venue: 
HRC Conference Room, A.D. Hope Building #14

This paper uses works of fiction and of history to argue for a deconstructive approach to the past. If the past has an ontology, it is a latent ontology that is activated when one does history. Here, it is the presence of past possibles that condition our possible pasts. What I mean by this is that our knowledge of the past is conditioned by what presents itself to us both in terms of its remains and in terms of our reception. The limits of what we are willing to accept as “past possibles” conditions what we are willing to accept as possible pasts.

 

Haunting History: Past Possibles and Possible Pasts

 

 

Professor Ethan Kleinberg

Wesleyan University, U.S.


Monday 5 December 2016, 4.15 – 5.30pm

HRC Conference Room, A.D Hope Building, ANU.

 

Updated: 27 May 2017/ Responsible Officer:  Head, HRC / Page Contact:  HRC administration