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The Australian National University

Seminar

Seminar

Historians at Work: Joint HRC/NLA Events

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Date: 
30 August, 2012 - 09:00 - 11 October, 2012 - 17:00

The National Library and the Humanities Research Centre at ANU presented a series of discussions about 'Historians at Work', featuring prominent Australian historians in conversation among themselves and with the audience.

Historians and the media 

Thursday 30 August, 2012
National Library Conference Room

With some notable exceptions, the traditional way for historians to publish the results of their research is through books and articles in scholarly journals.

Humanities Research Centre Seminar Series 2014

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Date: 
24 March, 2014 - 16:00 - 26 May, 2014 - 17:30

These Seminars will be held on selected Mondays from 4 – 5.30 pm, thoughout the year. The series will involve seminars by staff and Visiting Fellows of the Humanities Research Centre.

Convenor: Alastair MacLachlan
Contact: alastair.maclachlan@anu.edu.au

Semester One 2014

Fuel as Hope: The Humanities confronting climate change

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Date: 
19 June, 2012 - 16:00 - 17:30
Venue: 
Theatrette, Sir Roland Wilson Building, McCoy Circuit (Bld # 120)
administration.rsha@anu.edu.au
02 6125 6674

he seminar will open up a discussion of what is meant by potentiality as we explore the the idea of hope in fuels - potentiality, not systems of energy or power.

Over the past few years, Professor Pinkus' research has involved the possible contribution of the humanities can make to the discussion of climate change.  Most of her work has been of a speculative nature.

The Strange Nationality of Contemporary Poets

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Date: 
15 August, 2017 - 16:30 - 17:45

Event Series

HRC Seminar Series
Venue: 
Theatrette, Sir Roland Wilson Building
Humanities Research Centre
hrc@anu.edu.au
+61 2 6125 4357

In The Names of History: On the Poetics of Knowledge (1994),  Jacques Rancière takes issue with twentieth century French historians for their practice of explaining peoples’ actions in terms of the habitual practices of those of their milieu and point in time. His particular target is Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie’s micro-history of Montaillou (1975), a medieval village in the Languedoc region in the midst of the Cathar heresy.

Seminar | Temporal Strangers: Postcards from Tora Bora, Animation, and the Contemporary Art of War

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Date: 
8 August, 2017 - 16:30 - 17:45
Venue: 
SRWB Theatrette, Sir Roland Wilson Building
Humanities Research Centre
hrc@anu.edu.au
61 2 6125 4357

 

Strange New Women: The White Snake in Three Keys

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Date: 
1 August, 2017 - 16:30 - 17:45

Event Series

HRC Seminar Series
Venue: 
Sir Roland Wilson Building Theatrette
Humanities Research Centre
hrc@anu.edu.au
+61 2 6125 4357

The question of the stranger is at the heart of Strange New Women. The White Snake figure, as portrayed in the Chinese folk and literary traditions, is a stranger in the human realm. A snake spirit who transforms into a beautiful woman, she marries a human male, and, in some versions, even bears him a human son. Her strangeness and newness have much to do with the various forms of transgressions she embodies: gender, media, and political.

Ad Hominem #5

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Date: 
31 July, 2017 - 17:15 - 18:45

Event Series

Ad Hominem
Venue: 
Drawing Room, University House
Humanities Research Centre
hrc@anu.edu.au
+61 2 6125 4357

 

The third event in the 2017 Ad Hominem series features:

 

Dr Monque Rooney (School of Literature, Languages and Lingustics)

Assoc Prof Mitchell Whitelaw (School of Art and Design)

John Mackey (School of Music)

 

Ad Hominem

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ad hominem

 

The Humanities Research Centre and University House are delighted to present the 2017 series of 'ad hominem'.

Seminar // Dr Adam Broinowski, March 21

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Date: 
21 March, 2017 - 16:30 - 17:45
Venue: 
Seminar Room 1, Sir Roland Wilson Building

Ankoku butoh is an original Japanese dance form that emerged in the mid to late 1950s in Tokyo. Co-founded by Hijikata Tatsumi (1928–1986) and Ohno Kazuo (1906–2010), it was an artistic response to social conditions as the nation of Japan underwent radical shifts in Imperial Japan’s engagement in the Asia-Pacific war (1931–1945), defeat and US-led Occupation of Japan (1945–1952) and the US-Japan alliance formation within the cold war division system.

 
The Atomic Gaze and Occupied Bodies:

Performance in Japan during and after the Cold War

Dr Adam Broinowski, Australian National University

Tuesday 21 March 2017, 4:30 – 5:45pm

Seminar Room 1, Sir Roland Wilson Building, ANU

 

 
 

HRC Seminar Series 2016, Em. Prof. Ernest Hess-Lüttich, 29 November

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Date: 
29 November, 2016 - 16:15 - 17:30
Venue: 
HRC Conference Room, A.D. Hope Building #14

Sustainable urban planning is to be understood as a communicative process, which interlinks city architecture, technology, city district management and social infrastructure of neighbourhoods. The focus on sustainability brings up the question of under which discourse conditions architects and city planners can get into conversation with other urban actors, citizens, local administrators and politicians, and which cultural heritage should be preserved. Looking at the style of discourse in urban communication brings also its socio-cultural modalities into focus.

 

Urban Discourse: City space, city language, city planning

Eco-semiotic approaches to planning urban sustainability (with a look at the current transformation of the Tempelhof airport into a refugee camp)

 

 

 

Professor Emeritus Ernest W.B. Hess-Lüttich
University of Bern, Switzerland


Tuesday 29 November, 2016
4.15-5.30pm
HRC Conference Room, A.D Hope Building, ANU.

 

Updated: 23 November 2017/ Responsible Officer:  Head, HRC / Page Contact:  HRC administration