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The Australian National University

2013 Visiting Fellows

Dr Sarah PINTO, History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics, University of Queensland. History in the City: Indigenous Naming in Contemporary Australia. (14 January 2013 to 22 February 2013). Email: s.pinto@uq.edu.au

Dr Jonathan ADAMS, Scandinavian Languages, Uppsala University. The Roots of Islamophobia in Scandinavia. (1 February 2013 to 18 March 2013). Email: jon@dsl.dk

A/Professor Quentin STEVENS, Design Research Institute, RMIT University. Commemoration and Public Space. (10-23 February 2013 and 23 April - 3 May 2013). Email: e83369@ems.rmit.edu.au

Professor Kate DARIAN-SMITH, Australian Studies, University of Melbourne. Local Community, National Community. (14-15 April; 26 August - 6 October 2013; 4 November 2013 to 2 December 2013). Email: k.darian-smith@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Alison O'BYRNE, English and Related Literature, University of York. The Urban Tour, 1750-1830. (22 April 2013 to 22 May 2013). Email: alison.obyrne@york.ac.uk

Professor Ato QUAYSON, Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies, University of Toronto. Cities and Diasporas in the Global South. (12-26 May 2013). E: a.quayson@utoronto.ca

Dr Kathryn BROWN, Art History, University of Tilburg, Netherlands. Global Art and the Networked City. (1 June 2013 to 12 August 2013). Email: kathrynjbrown@mac.com

Professor Patricia FUMERTON, English, University of California, Santa Barbara. Moving Media, 1569-1789: Broadside Ballads, Cultural History and The Lady and the Blackamoor. (1 July 2013 to 28 July 2013). Email: pfumer@english.ucsb.edu

Professor Alan LIU, English, University of California, Santa Barbara. Media, History (Book Project). (1 July 2013 to 28 July 2013). Email: ayliu@english.ucsb.edu

Professor Birgit MERSMANN, European Art, Jacobs University, Germany. Asian Design of the Spectacular. (1 July 2013 to 15 August 2013). Email: b.mersmann@jacobs-university.de

Professor Penelope RUSSELL, History, University of Sydney.  Congregationalist Sydney. (1 July 2013 to 20 September 2013). Email: penny.russell@sydney.edu.au

Professor David WORRALL, English, Nottingham Trent University. Theatres and the Growth of British and American Cities, 1700-1830 etc…. (6 July 2013 to 28 September 2013). Email: david.worrall@ntu.ac.uk

Dr Amy GARNAI, English and American Studies, Tel Aviv University. Romantic-Era Theatre at the Edge: 1791-1888. (8 July 2013 to 17 August 2013). Email: amygarnai@yahoo.com

Dr Ioana LUCA, English, National Taiwan Normal University. Post-Communist Cities, Global Publics. (14 July 2013 to 23 August 2013). Email: ioana.luca@ntnu.edu.tw

Dr Tanja BUELTMANN, International History, Humanities Dept, Northumbria University. Making Urban Worlds: Ethnic Associationalism and Civic Life in the Wider British World, 1850-1930. (21 July 2013 to 30 August 2013). Email: tanja.bueltmann@northumbria.ac.uk

Professor Daniel HERWITZ, Humanities, University of Michigan & Honorary Research Associate, University of Cape Town. Operatic Ensembles in South Africa. (10 August 2013 to 26 August 2013). Email: herwitz@umich.edu

Professor Michael P. STEINBERG, Cogut Center for the Humanities
Brown University. TBA (10 August 2013 to 26 August 2013). Email: michael_steinberg@brown.edu

Dr Russell RODRIGO, Built Environment, University of New South Wales. Memory & Affect: Negotiating the Commemorative Landscape of Anzac Parade & King's Park, Canberra. (16 September 2013 to 19 October 2013). Email: russell.rodrigo@unsw.edu.au

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VISITING FELLOWS BIOGRAPHIES

PINTO, Dr Sarah
Dates: 14 January 2013 to 22 February 2013
Research Project: History in the City: Indigenous Naming in Contemporary Australia

Sarah Pinto is a lecturer in Australian history in the School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics at the University of Queensland. Sarah's research interests include historical fiction, memory, gender and sexuality, and the history of emotion. Much of her work considers the representation and mobilisation of the past - and especially of contested national pasts - in the present, particularly in the Australian context. Her current research examines the ways in which Australia's state and local governments are increasingly turning to programmes of Indigenous naming to commemorate and recognise Indigenous peoples and histories in central urban spaces.

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ADAMS, Dr Jonathan
Dates: 1 February 2013 to 18 March 2013.
Research project: The Roots of Islamophobia in Scandinavia

Jonathan Adams holds an MA from the University of Hull in Medieval Vernacular Languages and Literatures, an MSt in the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations from the University of Cambridge, and a PhD from University College London in Old Swedish and Old Norwegian. He is a research fellow for the Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities, at the Department of Scandinavian Languages, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
His publications are in the areas of medieval religious literature and culture, early Hebraism, and Jewish-Christian relations in Scandinavia. He is the author of Lessons in Contempt (Universitets-Jubilæets danske Samfund, 2013) and is editing The Jewish-Christian Encounter in Medieval Preaching (Routledge). He is currently working on a book Muslims and Jews in Medieval Scandinavian Texts: A Cultural Enquiry (publication intended with Brepols).
His research is shaped by issues surrounding the creation and sustenance of bigotry through language and art, early European prejudice towards non-Christians, and fantasies about a physically absent Other.
While at ANU, he will be investigating the portrayal of Muslims and Islam in medieval Danish and Swedish texts.

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STEVENS, A/Professor Quentin
Dates: 10-23 February 2013 and 23 April - 3 May 2013
Research Project: Commemoration and Public Space

Quentin Stevens has degrees in architecture and urban planning is an Associate Professor in the School of Architecture and Design at RMIT University, and Reader in Urban Design at the Bartlett School of Planning, University College London. His research focuses on environment-behaviour relations, in particular unplanned uses of public spaces. He is currently an ARC Future Fellow, and was previously a visiting researcher at Humboldt University in Berlin, funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. He is author of The Ludic City (2007) and, with Karen Franck, Spaces of Engagement: Memorial Design, Use and Meaning (2013), and co-editor of Loose Space (2007) and Transforming Urban Waterfronts (2010).

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DARIAN-SMITH, Professor Kate
Dates: (14-15 April 2013; 26 August - 6 October 2013;  4 November 2013 to 2 December 2013)
Research Project: Local Community, National Community

Kate Darian-Smith is Professor of Australian Studies History in the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, and Professor of Cultural Heritage in the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning at the University of Melbourne. Several of her recent ARC grants and publications in Australian studies and history have been focused on place and community, the history of childhood and schooling, memory, rural life, and cultural heritage.  While at the HRC, Kate will examine the representation and memories of urban sites and how different ‘publics’ may engage with place.  She will be presenting at the Shaping Canberra conference (17-20September) and running a public workshop on ‘Writing the Histories of Communities’ (1 October).

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O'BYRNE, Dr Alison
Dates: (22 April 2013 to 22 May 2013)
Research Project: The Urban Tour, 1750-1830

Alison O’Byrne is a Lecturer with the Department of English and Related Literature and Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies at the University of York.  She has wide-ranging interests in representations of the city in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century, and has published articles on the building of Westminster Bridge, the art of walking in early nineteenth-century London, and the London street scenes of the artist George Scharf.  She is completing a book on the representation of walking in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century London, and has edited a special issue of the London Journal on the topic of “London Scenes”.  Her research during the fellowship period will focus on the building of the national monument on Calton Hill in Edinburgh in the early nineteenth century.

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QUAYSON Professor Ato
Dates: 12-26 May 2013
Research Project: Cities and Diasporas in the Global South

Ato Quayson is Professor of English and Director of the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies at the University of Toronto, where he has been since August 2005. He did his BA at the University of Ghana and took his PhD from Cambridge University in 1995. He then went on to the University of Oxford as a Research Fellow, returning to Cambridge in Sept 1995 to become a Fellow at Pembroke College and a member of the Faculty of English where he eventually became a Reader in Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies.

Prof Quayson has published widely on African literature, postcolonial studies and in literary theory. His publications include:

Books

  • General Editor, Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry
  • Blackwell Companion to Diaspora and Transnationalism Studies, ed.with Girish Daswani (in press, New York: Blackwell, 2013).
  • Oxford St., Accra; Urban Evolution, Street Life and Itineraries of the Transnational (in press, Duke University Press, 2014).
  • The Cambridge History of Postcolonial Literature, ed., 2 volumes. (Cambridge University Press, 2012).
  • Labour Migration, Human Trafficking and Multinational Corporations (with Antonela Arhin; New York: Routledge, 2012).
  • Fathers and Daughters: An Anthology of Exploration, ed., (Oxford: Ayebia Publishers, 2008).

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BROWN Dr Kathryn
Dates: 1 June 2013 to 12 August 2013
Research Project: Global Art and the Networked City

Kathryn Brown holds a D.Phil in French from the University of Oxford and a PhD in Art History from the University of London. She is a tenured Assistant Professor of Art History at Tilburg University in the Netherlands. She is a Rhodes Scholar and has taught and held visiting fellowships at the University of Kent (United Kingdom), the University of British Columbia (Canada), and Tulane University (USA). Her research interests and publications span a range of areas including nineteenth-century French painting and literature, aesthetics, and contemporary art. Her most recent articles have been published in the Forum for Modern Language Studies, the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism and American Art.

Dr Brown is the author of Women Readers in French Painting 1870-1890 (Ashgate, 2012: ISBN 978-1-4094-0875-8). Read a review of the book in French Studies (2013) 67(2): 265.

Dr Brown has edited and contributed a chapter about Matisse and Baudelaire to a new book entitled The Art Book Tradition in Twentieth-Century Europe: Picturing Language (ISBN 978-1-4094-2065-1), forthcoming with Ashgate in 2013.

She is currently editing and contributing a chapter to a multi-author volume entitled Interactive Contemporary Art: New Participatory Practices (forthcoming I.B. Tauris, 2013).

Prior to becoming an art historian, Kathryn Brown was a partner in an international law firm in the City of London. She practised corporate law in London for fourteen years.

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FUMERTON, Professor Patricia
Dates: (1-28 July 2013)
Research Project: Moving Media, 1569-1789: Broadside Ballads, Cultural History and The Lady and the Blackamoor

Patricia Fumerton is Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Director of UCSB’s award-wining English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA), http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu. In addition to numerous articles, she is author of the monographs, Unsettled: The Culture of Mobility and the Working Poor in Early Modern England (Chicago, 2006) and Cultural Aesthetics: Renaissance Literature and the Practice of Social Ornament (Chicago, 1991). She is also editor of Broadside Ballads from the Pepys Collection: A Selection of Texts, Approaches, and Recordings (Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 2012) as well as co-editor of Ballads and Broadsides in Britain, 1500-1800 (Ashgate, 2010) and Renaissance Culture and the Everyday (Pennsylvania, 1999). She is currently working on her new book, Moving Media, 1679-1789: Broadside Ballads, Cultural History, and Protean Publics.
 

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LIU, Professor Alan
Dates: (1-28 July 2013)
Research Project: Media, History (Book Project)

Alan Liu is Professor in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an affiliated faculty member of UCSB’s Media Arts & Technology graduate program.

He began his research in the field of British romantic literature and art. His first book, Wordsworth: The Sense of History (Stanford Univ. Press, 1989), explored the relation between the imaginative experiences of literature and history. In a series of theoretical essays in the 1990s, he explored cultural criticism, the “new historicism,” and postmodernism in contemporary literary studies. In 1994, when he started his Voice of the Shuttle Web site for humanities research, he began to study information culture as a way to close the circuit between the literary or historical imagination and the technological imagination. In 2004, he published his The Laws of Cool: Knowledge Work and the Culture of Information (Univ. of Chicago Press). In 2008, he also published from Univ. of Chicago Press his Local Transcendence: Essays on Postmodern Historicism and the Database.

Liu founded the NEH-funded Teaching with Technology project at UC Santa Barbara called Transcriptions: Literature and the Culture of Information and his English Dept’s undergraduate specialization on Literature and the Culture of Information. During 2002-2007 he was a member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) and chair of the Technology/Software Committee of the ELO’s PAD Initiative (Preservation / Archiving / Dissemination of Electronic Literature).

Digital initiatives he has recently led include Transliteracies: Research in the Technological, Social, and Cultural Practices of Online Reading, a University of California multi-campus, collaborative research group (2005-10); and RoSE (Research-oriented Social Environment), a software project funded by a NEH Digital Humanities Start-up grant (2011-12) that is the culmination of Transliteracies. He is also co-founder and -leader of the international 4Humanities advocacy initiative as well as 4Humanities@UCSB (the UCSB 4Humanities local chapter formed as an Interdisciplinary Humanities Center Research Focus Group).

Liu is currently working on books about the digital humanities and the relationship between media and history.

After serving as Chair of his department during 2008-12, he is on leave in 2012-13 with an ACLS fellowship and short-term fellowships at the National Humanities Center and the Australian National University Humanities Research Centre.

Professor Alan Liu's full CV can be found online at http://liu.english.ucsb.edu/wp-includes/docs/liu-cv.pdf

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MERSMANN, Professor Birgit
Dates: 1 July 2013 to 15 August 2013
Research Project: Asian Design of the Spectacular

Birgit Mersmann holds a professorship in non-Western and European Art at the international Jacobs University in Bremen since 2008. From 2005 to 2007 she was a senior researcher of the National Competence Centre of Research “Iconic Criticism” at the University of Basel, Switzerland, investigating “iconoscriptures” as hybrid symbolic forms and inter-media expressions between image and writing. From 1998 to 2002 she taught as DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Visiting Professor at the department of German language and literature at Seoul National University in South Korea. Research foci include image and media theory, visuality and representation, art theory and aesthetics, contemporary East Asian and Western art, global art history, the history of Asian biennials, transculturality, visual cultural translation, interrelations between script and image.

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RUSSELL Professor Penelope
Dates: 1 July 2013 to 20 September 2013
Research Project: Congregationalist Sydney

I am fascinated by snobs and social climbers, scandals large and small, and the mysterious ways people lived, loved and learned in times past. Firmly wedded to the nineteenth century, I avidly pursue the 'small talk' of history in Australia and England, finding within private writing and the intimacies of social encounters (domestic and exotic) the political landscapes of gender and class, race and colonisation. I contribute to the cluster of research interest in 'Nation, Empire, Globe' an analysis of the social experience of colonisation in nineteenth-century Australia, particularly for women and particularly amongst elite groups. All these interests and more intersect in my research on the history of manners in Australia and in my writing on Jane, Lady Franklin (a snob of the first degree), whose bid to rescue her missing Arctic explorer husband Sir John Franklin in the mid-19th century made her a sentimental celebrity in England and across the Western world. My research in both these areas has been widely published both in Australia and overseas, and Arctic Romance: Lady Franklin and the Lost Polar Expedition will shortly be published by University of Toronto Press. Savage or Civilised? Manners in Colonial Australia was published by UNSW Press in 2010.

These research interests lead naturally to my matching obsession with the craft of history writing. What draws me to history is its unique combination of imaginative reconstruction and hard evidence, the way story telling is enriched by analysis, while analysis unfolds through story. Writing lies at the heart of the discipline of history, and in my teaching and still more in supervision I strive to build in students the confidence and skill to wield the curious power of words. I have received both the SUPRA 'Supervisor of the Year' award and the Vice-Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Higher Research Degree Supervision. I am one of the editors, with Richard White, of History Australia, the official journal of the Australian Historical Association.

Selected publications: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/history/staff/profiles/russell.shtml#pubs

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WORRALL Professor David
Dates: 6 July 2013 to 28 September 2013
Research Project: Theatres and the Growth of British and American Cities, 1700-1830 etc….

Professor Worrall researches the British romantic poet and painter William Blake (1757-1827) and was Principal Investigator (with Dr Nancy Cho) on a two year Panacea Society funded project on the ex-servant, ex-Quaker prophetic writer, Dorothy Gott.

He has just completed a manuscript for a monograph, Theatrical Intelligence: Eighteenth Century British Theatre and Social Assemblage Theatre, now in negotiation with Cambridge University Press. This is a novel transposition of a theory drawn from the social sciences and applied to play texts, actors' lives, celebrity cultures, theatre buildings and a range of archival sources connected to Georgian period theatre.

Professor Worrall has previously been a Fellow of the following institutions:

    Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington, CT
    Huntington Library, San Marino, California
    Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington DC
    Pennsylvania Historical Society / Library Company of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

In 2013 Professor Worrall will be Research Fellow at the Australian National University, Canberra as part of their centenary project on urban futures.

Selected publications

  • Drama. Worrall D in J Farlak and JM Wright (eds) A handbook of Romanticism Studies, Wiley-Blackwell, 2012, 177-194
  • Inconvenient truths: Re-historicizing the politics of dissent and antinomianism. Worrall D in M Crosby, T Patenaude and A Whitehead (eds) Re-Envisioning Blake, Palgrave McMillan, 2012
  • William Blake, the female prophet and the American agent: the evidence of the Swedenborgian east cheap conference.  Worrall D in J Mee and S Haggarty (eds) Blake and Conflict, Palgrave McMillan, 2009, 48-64
  • Chinese Indians: a James Gillray print, Covent Garden's The Loves of Bengal and the eighteenth-century Asian economic ascendancy. Worrall D, European Romantic Review, 2008, 19, 105-112
  • Theatric Revolution: Drama, Censorship and Romantic Period Subcultures. Worrall D, Oxford University Press, 2006
  • The Politics of Romantic Theatricality: The Road to the Stage. Worrall D, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007
  • Harlequin Empire: Race, Ethnicity and the Drama of the Popular Enlightenment. Worrall D, Pickering and Chatto, 2007

For full list of David's publications click on link.

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GARNAI, Dr Amy
Dates: 8 July 2013 to 17 August 2013
Research Project: Romantic-Era Theatre at the Edge: 1791-1888

Amy Garnai teaches in the Department of English and American Studies at Tel Aviv University and in the Department of English at the Kibbutzim College of Education. Her research focuses on the eighteenth-century and Romantic periods, with particular interests in women's writing, the theatre and, more generally, the intersection of politics and literature in the 1790s. Her book, Revolutionary Imaginings in the 1790s: Charlotte Smith, Mary Robinson, Elizabeth Inchbald, was published by Palgrave in 2009. Her essays have appeared in journals such as The Review of English Studies, Eighteenth-Century Studies, SEL and Women's Writing. She has previously held a British Academy Visiting Fellowship at the Center for Eighteenth-Century Studies at the University of York, and a visiting fellowship at the Huntington Library. Her current project examines Romantic-era theatre and its afterlives in Britain, America and Australia.

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LUCA, Dr Ioana
Dates: 14 July 2013 to 23 August 2013
Research Project: Post-Communist Cities, Global Publics

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Ioana Luca is Assistant Professor at National Taiwan Normal University, where she teaches courses in American studies, and 20th century American literature, life writing and memory studies. Her research focuses on contemporary American literature, post-1989 Eastern European life writing, as well as American Studies in global contexts. She has published articles in Social Text, Rethinking History, Prose Studies, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, EJLW, chapters in edited volumes, and several translations in and from Romanian. She is the principal investigator of the project Discourses of Memory in Eastern European Exiles’ Life Writing and is completing a book on autobiography and exile in contemporary American literature.

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BUELTMANN, Dr Tanja
Dates: 21 July to 30 August 2013
Research Project: Making Urban Worlds: Ethnic Associationalism and Civic Life in the Wider British World, 1850-1930

Tanja is Senior Lecturer in History at Northumbria University, England. Her research interests are in British World history, especially the cultural and social history of English, Scottish and German immigrant communities. She is particularly interested in the communities' associational life in the Antipodes, North America and the wider British World. Tanja is Co-Investigator of the English Diaspora Project (http://www.englishdiaspora.co.uk) which is funded by the UK’s Arts & Humanities Research Council. The Project seeks to challenge established scholarship that has described the English in North America as ‘invisible migrants’, studying them in depth from the mid 18th century to 1950. Tanja also continues to investigate the Scots abroad. Having been awarded a Small Research Grant from the British Academy in 2010 for her project ‘Ethnicity, Associationalism and Civility: The Scots in Singapore and Hong Kong in Comparative Perspective, Tanja is currently in the process of assessing the material gleaned during her research in the two city entrepots. The research on the Scots in Hong Kong and Singapore will feed into her second monograph, Clubbing Together: Ethnicity, Civility and Formal Sociability in the Scottish Diaspora to 1930, which is under contract with Liverpool University Press.

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HERWITZ Professor Daniel
Dates: 10 August 2013 to 26 August 2013
Research Project: Operatic Ensembles in South Africa

Daniel Herwitz is the author of books in aesthetics, politics and modern and contemporary art, most recently Heritage, Culture and Politics in the Postcolony (2012) and The Star as Icon (2008).  From 1996-2002 he was Chair in Philosophy at the University of Natal, South Africa where he participated in the process of democratic transition, and which led to his book of essays, Race and Reconciliation (2003). His first book, on the modern painter of India, M.F. Husain (Husain, Tata Press) produced in consort with the painter, won a National Book Award in India (1988).  He is editor of The Don Giovanni Moment with Lydia Goehr, and originated the exchange program between the University of Cape Town School of Opera and the University of Michigan. From 2002-2012 he Directed the Institute for the Humanities at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he is now Fredric Huetwell Professor of Comparative Literature, History of Art and Philosophy.

Selected Publications include:
• (2012) Heritage, Culture, and Politics in the Postcolony
• (2012) Heritage, Culture, and Politics in the Postcolony
• (2008) Midnight's Diaspora
• (2008) The Star as Icon
• (2008) Aesthetics
• (2003) Race and Reconciliation

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STEINBERG Professor Michael P.
Dates:10 August 2013 to 26 August 2013

Michael P. Steinberg is the Director of the Cogut Center for the Humanities, the Barnaby Conrad and Mary Critchfield Keeney Professor of History, and Professor of Music and German Studies at Brown University. He serves as Associate Editor of The Musical Quarterly  and The Opera Quarterly. He is a member of the Executive Board of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI) and of the Board of Directors of the Barenboim-Said Foundation USA.. Between 2009 and 2013 he serves as dramaturg on a joint production of Wagner’s Ring of the Nibelung at the Berlin State Opera and the Teatro alla Scala, Milan.

Educated at Princeton University and the University of Chicago, he has been a visiting professor at these two schools as well as at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris and National Tsing-hua University in Taiwan. He was a member of the Cornell University Department of History between 1988 and 2005. Principal research interests include the cultural history of modern Germany and Austria with particular attention to German Jewish intellectual history and the cultural history of music. He has written and lectured widely on these topics for the New York Times and at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the Bard Music Festival, the Aspen Music Festival and School, and the Salzburg Festival. He has received fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation as well as the Berlin Prize from the American Academy, Berlin. He is the author of studies of Hermann Broch, Aby Warburg, and Walter Benjamin, of Austria as Theater and Ideology: The Meaning of the Salzburg Festival (Cornell University Press, 2000), of which the German edition (Ursprung und Ideologie der Salzburger Festspiele; Anton Pustet Verlag, 2000) won Austria's Victor Adler Staatspreis in 2001.  Current and recent books are Listening to Reason: Culture, Subjectivity, and 19th- Century Music (Princeton University Press,  2004);  Reading Charlotte Salomon , co-edited with Monica Bohm-Duchen (Cornell University Press, 2006); Judaism Musical and Unmusical (University of Chicago Press, 2007).

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RODRIGO, Dr Russell
Dates: 16 September to 19 October 2013
Research Project: Memory & Affect: Negotiating the Commemorative Landscape of Anzac Parade & King's Park, Canberra

Dr Russell Rodrigo is an Architect and Senior Lecturer with the Faculty of the Built Environment, University of New South Wales.  His research focuses on the spatialization of memory and its relationship with interiority at the scale of both the public and the private.  He is the designer of a number of memorial projects, has published through international journals and conferences and his research has been recognised nationally, including the awarding of the British Council Design Research Award.

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Updated: 15 October 2013/ Responsible Officer:  Head, HRC / Page Contact:  HRC administration