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The Australian National University

2012 Visiting Fellows

Professor Lorraine CODE, Philosophy, York University. Ecological Thinking, Climate-Change Scepticism, and the Epistemology of Testimony. (23 January 2012 to 13 April 2012). Email: codelb@yorku.ca

Dr Jan RUEGER, History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck College, University of London. A History of the Anglo-German Relationship. (30 January 2012 to 20 April 2012). Email: j.rueger@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Clara TUITE, English, University of Melbourne. Literary Romanticism and Romantic Ecology. (13 February 2012 to 4 May 2012). Email: clarat@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Peter GRATTON, Philosophy, Memorial University in Newfoundland. Ecologies of Time. (9 May 2012 till 16 July 2012). Email: pmgratton@gmail.com

Dr Vincent BRUYERE, French and Francophone Studies, Pennsylvania State University. Sense of Survival: The Writing of Environmental History in the French Atlantic World. (29 May 2012 to 8 August 2012). Email: vxb11@psu.edu

Professor Karen PINKUS, Romance Studies, Cornell University. Poetic Dwelling: The Humanities Confronts Climate Change. (1 June 2012 to 1 July 2012). Email: kpinkus@gmail.com

Professor Srinivas ARAVAMUDAN, English, Duke University. (13 June 2012 to 4 July 2012). Email: srinivas@duke.edu

Professor Ranjana KHANNA, English & Women's Studies, Duke University, USA. (13 June 2012 to 4 July 2012). Email: rkhanna@duke.edu

Professor Yvette TAYLOR , Weeks Centre for Social and Policy Research, London South Bank University. The Future of the Global University: Diverse Spaces, Diverse Subjects. (23 June 2012 to 15 September 2012). Email: taylory@lsbu.ac.uk

Dr Adeline JOHNS-PUTRA, English, University of Exeter. A Literary History of Climate Change. (16 July 2012 to 14 September 2012). Email: a.g.johns-putra@exeter.ac.uk

Professor Graham HUGGAN, Postcolonial Literatures, University of Leeds. Threatened Worlds: Famous Faces: Celebrity Conservationism in the Television Age. (26 August 2012 to 16 September 2012). Email: g.d.m.huggan@leeds.ac.uk

Dr Helen McDONALD, Art History Program, University of Melbourne. A dry aesthetic: art, dry country and climate change. (17 September 2012 to 10 December 2012). E: hmcd@bigpond.net.au

Dr Rachel SWEENEY, Dance, Liverpool Hope University. Topographic Choreographies: Staging dance ecology through transnational terrain performance practices. (17 September 2012 to 7 December 2012). Email: sweener@hope.ac.uk

Dr Ingrid SYKES, La Trobe University, Melbourne. Ecological Enlightenment: Listening and the Natural World in Eighteenth-Century France. (24 September 2012 to 17 December 2012). Email: i.sykes@latrobe.edu.au

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VISITING FELLOWS BIOGRAPHIES

CODE, Professor Lorraine
Dates: 23 January 2012 to 13 April 2012
Research Project: Ecological Thinking, Climate-Change Scepticism, and the Epistemology of Testimony

Lorraine Code is Distinguished Research Professor Emerita in Philosophy at York University in Toronto Canada, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. She is the author of Epistemic Responsibility (1987), and What Can She Know? Feminist Theory and the Construction of Knowledge (1991). In Rhetorical Spaces: Essays on (Gendered) Locations (1995), she addresses incredulity, empathy, relativism, and the epistemic power of gossip. Ecological Thinking: The Politics of Epistemic Location (Oxford University Press 2006) develops an “ecological naturalism”, which looks to ecological science where Quineans look to cognitive science, as a place - literal and metaphorical - where knowledge is “naturally” made.
In 2010 she was a Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities at Edinburgh University. She is currently working on issues of testimony, ignorance, and vulnerability especially as these pertain to climate change scepticism.

More information: http://lorrainecode.com

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RUEGER, Dr Jan
Dates: 30 January 2012 to 20 April 2012
Research Project: A History of the Anglo-German Relationship

Jan Rueger teaches Modern European History at Birkbeck, University of London.
His research focuses on the history of Britain and Germany in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His monograph The Great Naval Game: Britain and Germany in the Age of Empire (Cambridge, 2007) explores the theatre of power and identity that unfolded between the two countries in the decades before 1914. His research interests also include the relationship between laughter and power in modern Germany, a topic on which he has published a number of articles. He is currently writing a new history of the Anglo-German relationship.

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TUITE, Dr Clara
Dates: 13 February 2012 to 4 May 2012
Research Project: Literary Romanticism and Romantic Ecology

Clara Tuite is Senior Lecturer in English, University of Melbourne, where she teaches and researches primarily in British Romantic literature and cultural history. She is the author of Romantic Austen: Sexual Politics and the Literary Canon (Cambridge University Press, 2002), and is currently completing a monograph entitled ‘Proverbial Notorious: Lord Byron and the Rites of Scandalous Celebrity’.

While at the HRC, she will be working on literary Romanticism and Romantic-period ecology, focusing on Mary Wollstonecraft and social utopias as part of a larger study of literary Romanticism and the cultural history of romantic love, and on Maria Edgeworth and the culture and ecology of the Irish boglands. She will also be working with Gillian Russell (English, School of Critical Enquiry) on a project on Regency Spaces.

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GRATTON, Dr Peter
Dates: 9 May 2012 till 16 July 2012
Research Project: Ecologies of Time

Peter Gratton teaches philosophy at the Memorial University of Newfoundland. He has published numerous articles in political and intercultural philosophy and is the author of The State of Sovereignty: Lessons from the Political Fictions of Modernity (SUNY Press, 2012) and Speculative Realism (Continuum, forthcoming). An executive editor of Radical Philosophy Review, Co-Editor of the journal Society and Space (Environmental Planning D), Peter has also edited two works: Traversing the Imaginary (Northwestern University Press, 2007), co-edited with John Mannousakis, and Jean-Luc Nancy and Plural Thinking: Expositions of World, Politics, Art, and Sense (SUNY Press, 2012), co-edited with Marie-Eve Morin. His focus at the Humanities Research Centre, ANU will be to link current movements in materialism to "ecological enlightenment."

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BRUYERE, Dr Vincent
Dates: 29 May 2012 to 8 August 2012
Research Project: Sense of Survival: The Writing of Environmental History in the French Atlantic World

Vincent Bruyere is an assistant professor in the department of French and Francophone Studies at the Pennsylvania State University. His research interests touch upon problematics of self-formation and cultural identity in the modern research University. He has recently completed a book manuscript on the notion of francophone difference and its impact on French literary history. His new research project examines the cultural dimension of politics of life, especially the formation of medical and environmental humanities.

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PINKUS, Professor Karen
Dates:  1 June 2012 to 1 July 2012
Research Project: Poetic Dwelling: The Humanities Confronts Climate Change

Karen Pinkus is Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature at Cornell University where she is also a Faculty Fellow of the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future and a member of the climate change focus group. She is the author, recently, of numerous articles on climate change and the humanities. A forthcoming book, The Poetics of Fuels, will address various fuels (as distinct from energy systems)--actually existing and imagined--as potentialities. At Cornell she will co-teach a class with a colleague from Earth and Environmental Sciences on humans and climate change.

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ARAVAMUDAN, Professor Srinivas
Dates: 13 June 2012 to 4 July2012

Srinivas Aravamudan was appointed dean of the humanities at Duke in July 2009. At Duke, he is Professor in the Departments of English, Romance Studies, and the Program in Literature. He directed the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute (2003-2009) and is president of the Consortium of Humanties Centers and Institutes from 2007-2012. He has published Tropicopolitans: Colonialism and Agency, 1688-1804 (1999, Duke University Press) and Guru English: South Asian Religion In a Cosmopolitan Language (2006, Princeton University Press and 2007, Penguin India). His next book, Enlightenment Orientalism: Resisting the Rise of the Novel, will be published by the University of Chicago Press in 2011.  Aravamudan has also edited a number of other publications and written a large number of scholarly articles and essays on topics that range from eighteenth-century studies to postcolonial theory, and political philosophy to the theory of fiction.  He is currently writing a book on sovereignty and the concept of anachronism.

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KHANNA Professor Ranjana
Dates: 13 June 2012 to 4 July 2012

Professor Ranjana Khanna, English & Wom¬en’s Studies, Duke University, USA. Professor Khanna works on Anglo- and Francophone Postcolonial theory and literature, Psychoanalysis, and Feminist theory. She has published articles on transna¬tional feminism, psychoanalysis, autobiography, post¬colonial agency, multiculturalism in an international context, postcolonial Joyce, Area Studies and Women’s Studies, and Algerian film. She is the author of Dark Continents: Psychoanalysis and Colonialism (2003) and Algeria Cuts: Women and Representation 1830 to the present (2008). Her current book project is entitled “Asylum: The Concept and the Practice.”
 

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TAYLOR, Professor Yvette
Dates:  23 June 2012 to 15 September 2012
Research Project: The Future of the Global University: Diverse Spaces, Diverse Subjects

Yvette Taylor is Professor in Social and Policy Studies and Head of the Weeks Centre for Social and Policy Research, London South Bank University; the Centre hosts the next Gender and Education Association international conference (2013)  titled Compelling Diversities, Educational Intersections: Policy, Practice, Parity. She has held a Fulbright Scholarship at Rutgers University (2010-11). Books include Fitting Into Place? Class and Gender Geographies and Temporalities (Ashgate, 2012); Lesbian and Gay Parenting: Securing Social and Educational Capitals (Palgrave, 2009) and Working-Class Lesbian Life: Classed Outsiders (Palgrave, 2007). Edited collections include Educational Diversity (Palgrave, 2012); Sexualities: Reflections and Futures (2012); Theorizing Intersectionality and Sexuality (Palgrave, 2010) and Classed Intersections: Spaces, Selves, Knowledges (Ashgate, 2010). She has articles in a range of journals including British Journal of the Sociology of Education, European Societies, Sociological Research Online, Sexualities, Feminist Theory and she edited the Special Issue of Sexualities Feb. 2011 (Sexuality and Class).  Yvette is currently working on an ESRC standard grant ‘Making space for queer identifying religious youth’ (2011-13) and recently completed an ESRC (2007-2009) funded project ‘From the Coal Face to the Car Park? Intersections of Class and Gender in the North East of England’. She regularly blogs on the British Sociological Association’s (BSA) Sociology and the Cuts and the Gender and Education Association (GEA) websites and is director of the MA Gender and Sexuality at the Weeks Centre. Follow Yvette @YvetteTaylor

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JOHNS-PUTRA, Dr Adeline
Dates: 16 July 2012 to 14 September 2012
Research Project: A Literary History of Climate Change

Dr. Adeline Johns-Putra is a Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Exeter. Her research interests lie in environmental criticism, Romanticism and genre. She is the author of two books, Heroes and Housewives: Women's Epic Poetry and Domestic Ideology in the Romantic Age (2001) and The History of the Epic (2006), and editor, with Catherine Brace, of a collection of interdisciplinary essays, Process: Landscape and Text (2010). She is Chair of the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE), UK and Ireland. As part of a major European Social Fund project on imagining climate change, she is completing a monograph, with Adam Trexler, tentatively entitled ‘Anthropocene Fictions: The Novel in a Time of Climate Change’.

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HUGGAN, Professor Grahamr
Dates: 23 June 2012 to 15 September 2012
Research Project: The Future of the Global University: Diverse Spaces, Diverse Subjects

My research spans the entire field of comparative postcolonial literary/cultural studies, and I also have interests in the areas of travel writing, ecocriticism, short fiction, and film. Recent publications include Postcolonial Ecocriticism: Literature, Animals, Environment (co-written with Helen Tiffin, Routledge, 2010), Extreme Pursuits: Travel/Writing in an Age of Globalization (University of Michigan Press, 2009), and a collection of essays, Racism, Postcolonialism, Europe (co-edited with Ian Law, Liverpool University Press, 2009). A revised collection of my own essays, Interdisciplinary Measures, came out in 2008, also with Liverpool University Press. Such work shows my continuing interest in cross-disciplinary approaches to postcolonial studies, as is also confirmed by the book series for which I am the founding co-editor, 'Postcolonialism across the Disciplines' (Liverpool University Press). Current projects include a book on the figure of the 'celebrity conservationist', which is contracted to the major UK-based independent environmental publisher Earthscan, and I also hope to embark soon on a book-length study of postcolonial film. I am sole editor of the 250,000-word Oxford Handbook of Postcolonial Studies (estimated publication date 2013).

I am on the editorial board of numerous journals in the postcolonial field, am a regular national/international examiner and reviewer, and am a current member of the English Association (UK) and the MLA (US). I am also an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Queensland (Australia). At the University of Leeds, I currently direct the Centre for Canadian Studies (CCS) and the Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies (ICPS), both cross-disciplinary bodies drawing on a wide range of university teaching and research in these fields. I am also project co-leader for an AHRC-funded international research network, 'Postcolonial Europe', with partners in Germany (the University of Munich) and the Netherlands (the University of Utrecht), now in its second three-year phase, and network leader for a White Rose Consortium-sponsored project on the political ecology of water in Egypt, Israel/Palestine and Sri Lanka. I regularly organise events at Leeds--many of them postgraduate-oriented--for the two networks I lead, for the ICPS and CCS, and for the School-based Postcolonial Research Group, and am general convenor of 'Postcolonial Literary and Cultural Studies', the School of English's postcolonial MA scheme.

I have supervised PhD research, both at Leeds and elsewhere, on a wide range of topics and would welcome the opportunity to supervise further work in all areas of the postcolonial field, in the crossover area between literary and environmental criticism, in tourism studies and travel literature, and in contemporary film.  

In 2011 I gave invited talks in France (Paris) and Estonia (Tartu); I have also been appointed external examiner for MA English programmes at the University of Hong Kong and have been invited to Australian National University as a Humanities Research Centre Visiting Fellow, a one-month fellowship I will take up in August 2012. Over the last three years I have published three books (see Research Activities, above) and several articles in top journals; I have also given invited lectures and/or keynote addresses in numerous countries, including Canada, New Zealand and Australia, and have helped organise conferences and workshops in Germany, the Netherlands and the UK.

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McDONALD, Dr Helen
Dates: 17 September 2012 to 10 December 2012
Research Project: A dry aesthetic: art, dry country and climate change

Helen McDonald is an Honorary Fellow in the Art History Program, School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne.  She is the author of Erotic Ambiguities: The Female Nude in Art (London & New York: Routledge) 2001 and Patricia Piccinini: Nearly Beloved (Sydney: Piper Press) 2012. Focusing on contemporary and late modernist art, including Australian Aboriginal art, her recent research explores aesthetics of dryness and dry country through the lens of climate change. She posits that an aesthetics of dry country forces acknowledgement of ecological damage in Australia and responsibility for a sustainable future.

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SWEENEY, Dr Rachel
Dates: 17 September 2012 to 7 December 2012
Research Project: Topographic Choreographies: Staging dance ecology through transnational terrain performance practices

Dr Rachel Sweeney is currently the Acting Head of Dance at Liverpool Hope University, UK where she also runs cross disciplinary research forums between Performing Arts and Environmental Science. Taught specialisms include: dance ethnography, site based choreography, European Dance Theatre history, and sustainable education.

Rachel is co-director of a transnational terrain arts and ecology partnership together with Perth based dance artist Marnie Orr. Ongoing projects have been supported by the Centre for Interdisciplinary Arts, Perth, the Centre for Sustainable Futures, University of Plymouth, and the Centre for Contemporary Arts and the Natural World, UK.
Rachel has received several awards for her independent research into the Japanese dance art of Butoh from the Arts Council of Ireland and Dublin Corporation, as well as two solo performance commissions from Butoh UK (2003) and Dance in Devon (2009) and has published on dance ethnography, dance ecology and cross cultural performance training.

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SYKES, Dr Ingrid
Dates: 24 September 2012 to 17 December 2012
Research Project: Ecological Enlightenment: Listening and the Natural World in Eighteenth-Century France

Ingrid Sykes currently teaches history at La Trobe University, Melbourne. Her first monograph, Women, Science and Sound in Nineteenth-Century France (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2007), examined the interrelationship between female performers, technology, and institutional politics in nineteenth-century Paris. She has published articles in French History, the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences (co-authored with Penelope Gouk), Medical History and French History and Civilization: Papers from the George Rudé Seminar, and has a forthcoming article in the Journal of Eighteenth-Century Studies. In addition to her interest in cultural and political history, she has also worked in the fields of the history of technology, medicine and science with particular expertise in sound. In 2003, she commenced an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) postdoctoral research fellowship at the Department of History, University of Warwick, UK followed by a Wellcome Trust Research Fellowship at the Centre for the History of Medicine at Warwick. She has worked as a member of the research team, ‘Histoire de l’Invention et des Savoirs Techniques’, Centre d’Histoire des Techniques (CDHTE), Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers, Paris, led by Liliane Hilaire-Pérez, and peer-reviewed applications and proposals for the Wellcome Trust, the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and Imperial College Press, UK. She has spoken at conferences in the US (American Association of the History of Medicine, 2010), the UK (‘Mastering the Emotions’, Centre for the History of Emotions, Queen Mary, University of London, 2011) and France (Département d’Etudes Cognitives, Ecole Normale Supérieure and the Laboratoire de Psychologie de la Perception, CNRS, Université Paris Descartes, 2008). In 2009, she brought together historians, musicologists and auditory neuroscientists from the US, UK and France for an international symposium, “Signalling Sound”, at the Arden Conference Centre, University of Warwick. She is currently working on a book, The Humanity of Hearing in Modern Europe. It has a particular focus on the relationship between the human ear, the natural environment and political ideology in the European Enlightenment.

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Updated: 4 December 2012/ Responsible Officer:  Head, HRC / Page Contact:  HRC administration