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The Australian National University

2011 Visiting Fellows

Professor Richard KING,American and Canadian Studies, University of Nottingham, UK. "The World" in Hannah Arendt. (15 January 2011 to 9 April 2011). Email: richard.king@nottingham.ac.uk

Professor Fred INGLIS, Em. Professor, University of Sheffield, UK. The Travellers: ways of worldmaking on the move. (19 January 2011 to 26 February 2011). Email: fred.inglis@uku.co.uk

Professor Stuart ELDEN, Political Geography, Durham University, UK. The Space of the World: Philosophy, Globalisation, Territory. (21 February 2011 to 15 May 2011). Email: stuart.elden@durham.ac.uk

Dr Thomas BERGHUIS, Asian Art, Art History & Film Studies, University of Sydney. 'This Art of Mankind’ – Making the World in Modern and Contemporary Indonesian Art. (7 March 2011 to 6 June 2011). Email:  thomas.berghuis@sydney.edu.au

Dr Kent FEDOROWICH, British Imperial and Commonwealth History, UWE, UK. Mapping the Contours of the British World. (4 April 2011 to 26 June 2011). Email: kent.fedorowich@uwe.ac.uk

A/Professor Tsan Huang TSAI, Music Department, Chinese University of Hong Kong. Relational Instruments: How Bendigo's Past Soundscape is Shaping its Present and
Future.
(26 April 2011 to 11 July 2011). Email: thtsai@me.com

Professor Vijay MISHRA,  English and Comparative Literature, Murdoch University, Australia. Worldmaking: the sublime case of Salman Rushdie. (21 May 2011 to 14 August 2011). Email: v.mishra@murdoch.edu.au

A/Professor Vilashini COOPPAN, Literature, University of California at Santa Cruz, USA. Race, Writing and the Literary World System. (25 June 2011 to 15 August 2011). Email: vcooppan@ucsc.edu

Professor Srinivas ARAVAMUDAN, English, Duke University. Fictional Orients. (11 July 2011 to 11 August 2011). Email: srinivas@duke.edu

Professor Ranjan KHANNA, English & Women's Studies, Duke University, USA. Asylum: The Concept and the Practice. (11 July 2011 to 11 August 2011). Email: rkhanna@duke.edu

Dr Giorgio RIELLO, Global History, University of Warwick, UK. Global Textiles: Material Culture and fashion in the Modern World. (10 July 2011 to 11 September 2011). Email: g.riello@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Matthew POTTER, Art History, University of Leicester, UK. The Contribution of Germanic Settlers to Visual Culture in Australia, 1850-1950. (4 July 2011 to 14 September 2011). Email: mcp20@le.ac.uk

Dr Thomas McLEAN, English, University of Otago, New Zealand. Citizens of the World: A Critical Biography of the Porter Family. (22 August 2011 to 14 November 2011 ). Email: thomas.mclean@otago.ac.nz

Dr Joanne FOX, Modern History, Durham University, UK. Global Identities and the Documentary Form: John Grierson and International Film. (1 September 2011 to 24 November 2011 ). Email: j.c.fox@dur.ac.uk

Dr Katrina O'LOUGHLIN, Honorary Research Fellow, Social Sciences and Cultural Studies, University of Western Australia. Eighteenth-century cosmopolitanisms: affiliation, identity and cultural exchange. (26 September 2011 to 14 November 2011). Email: katrina.oloughlin@uwa.edu.au

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VISITING FELLOWS BIOGRAPHIES

King, Professor Richard
Dates: 15 January 2011 to 9 April 2011
Research Project: "The World" in Hannah Arendt

Richard KingRichard H. King is Professor (Emeritus) in American Studies at University of Nottingham, UK. His special area of interest is intellectual history--of the US, Europe and the Black Atlantic. His particular interests focus on political thought and critiques of race and racism,along with the exploration of the cross-cultural and transnational movement of ideas and systems of thought. Most recently he has authored Race, Culture and the Intellectuals, 1940-1970 (2004)and co-edited Hannah Arendt and the Uses of History (2007) with Professor Dan Stone. He is presently working on a project, The American Arendt, that will assess Arendt's influence on American thought and culture--and the latter's influence on her thought.

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Inglis, Professor Fred
Dates: 19 January 2011 to 26 February 2011
Research Project: The Travellers: ways of worldmaking on the move

Fred Inglis

Fred Inglis is a Professor Emeritus at the University of Sheffield and Honorary Professor of Cultural History at the University of Warwick.  He has been a member of the School of Social Science at the  Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton, a Fellow at the Netherlands Institute in Wassenaar,  and visited the HRC as a Fellow in 1984 and 2008. He has been a member of the British Labour Party all his adult life and has stood four times for the British Parliament.His most recent books include People's Witness: the Journalist in Modern Politics( Yale 2002 ), Culture ( Polity 2004), History Man: the life of RG Collingwood (2009) and A Short History of Celebrity(2010) , both these latter from Princeton.His wife , Eileen, who is accompanying him to HRC, has been since 1989  one of Her Majesty's Inspectors of Schools.

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Elden, Professor Stuart
Dates: 21 February 2011 to 15 May 2011
Research Project: The Space of the World: Philosophy, Globalisation, Territory

Stuart EldenStuart Elden is a Professor of Political Geography at Durham University, and the editor of the journal Society and Space. He is the author of four books, including most recently, Terror and Territory: The Spatial  Extent of Sovereignty (University of Minnesota Press, 2009). He is currently completing a history of the concept of territory, and while at ANU will begin a book thinking the relation between philosophy, globalisation and territory, tentatively entitled The Space of the World
 

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Berghuis, Dr Thomas
Dates: 7 March 2011 to 6 June 2011
Research Project: 'This Art of Mankind’ – Making the World in Modern and Contemporary Indonesian Art

Thomas J. Berghuis is a lecturer in Asian Art at the Department of Art History & Film Studies and Deputy Director of the Australian Centre of Asian Art & Archaeology at the University of Sydney. During the past ten years he has worked extensively in the field of modern and contemporary Chinese art with special focus on the development of experimental art in China over the past thirty years. Starting in 2006 he has also been travelling regularly to Indonesia, where he has been working with the contemporary art scene, particularly across Java. He is the author of Performance Art in China (Timezone 8, 2006). He is currently working on two book manuscripts. The first book China and A World of Contemporary Art will be based around a series of essays, which explore the development of a new discourse of contemporary Chinese art in relation to global art after 2000. His second book This Art of Mankind – Modern and Contemporary Art in Indonesia, which he will commence at ANU, explores the historical continuity of modern into contemporary art in Indonesia.

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Fedorowich,, Dr Kent
Dates: 4 April 2011 to 26 June 2011
Research Project: Mapping the Contours of the British World

Kent Fedorowich grew up in south-western Manitoba, Canada.  He took his BA and MA in History at the University of Saskatchewan.  His PhD in History, which was awarded by the London School of Economics, examined the resettlement of British ex-servicemen in the dominions after the Great War.  It was published in John M. MacKenzie’s ‘Studies in Imperialism’ series.  A Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, he has been teaching in the Department of History at the University of the West of England (Bristol) since 1989. Empire migration remains a central pillar of his research today, but he is also a leading international authority on POW history and Anglo-dominion relations. In 2007, he organized the British World Conference which was convened in Bristol.

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Tsai, A/Professor Tsan Huang
Dates: 26 April 2011 to 11 July 2011
Research Project: Relational Instruments: How Bendigo's Past Soundscape is Shaping its Present and Future

Tsan Huang Tsai is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research covers a wild range of disciplines, including ethnomusicology, organology, material anthropology, and Chines studies.  He is the author of an edited book Captured Memories of a Fading Musical Past: The Chinese Instrument Collection at the Music Department of the Chinese University of Hong Kong (2010), and 17 research articles. During his stay at ANU, Tsan Huang will be working on a new project “Relational Instruments: How Bendigo's Past Soundscape is Shaping its Present and Future” that is developed during his 2009 Endeavour Fellowship from Australian government. For more information, please visit http://web.me.com/thtsai/CUHKMUSIC/Welcome.html.

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Mishra, Professor Vijay
Dates: 21 May 2011 to 14 August 2011
Research Project: Worldmaking: the sublime case of Salman Rushdie

Vijay Mishra, PhD (ANU), DPhil(Oxford), FAHA, is Professor of English Literature and Australia Research Council (ARC) Professorial Fellow  at Murdoch University. Among his publications are: Dark Side of the Dream: Australian Literature and the Postcolonial Mind (with Bob Hodge) (Allen and Unwin,1991), The Gothic Sublime (State University of New York Press, 1994), Devotional Poetics and the Indian Sublime (SUNY, 1998),  Bollywood Cinema: Temples of Desire (Routledge, 2002) and The  Literature of the Indian Diaspora: Theorizing the Diasporic Imaginary (Routledge, 2007). 

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Cooppan A/Professor Vilashini
Dates: 25 June 2011 to 15 August 2011
Research Project: Race, Writing and the Literary World System
 
Associate Professor Cooppan teaches literature at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Her essays on postcolonial and world literatures, globalization theory, psychoanalysis, and nationalism have appeared in Symploke, Comparative Literature Studies, and several published and forthcoming edited volumes. She is the author of Worlds Within: National Narratives and Global Connections in Postcolonial Writing (2009).

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Aravamudan Professor Srinivas
Dates: 2 July 2011 to 11 August 2011
Research Project: Fictional Orients

Srinivas Aravamudan was appointed dean of the humanities at Duke in July 2009. At Duke, he is Professor in the Departments of English, Romance Studies, and the Program in Literature. He directed the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute (2003-2009) and is president of the Consortium of Humanties Centers and Institutes from 2007-2012. He has published Tropicopolitans: Colonialism and Agency, 1688-1804 (1999, Duke University Press) and Guru English: South Asian Religion In a Cosmopolitan Language (2006, Princeton University Press and 2007, Penguin India). His next book, Enlightenment Orientalism: Resisting the Rise of the Novel, will be published by the University of Chicago Press in 2011.  Aravamudan has also edited a number of other publications and written a large number of scholarly articles and essays on topics that range from eighteenth-century studies to postcolonial theory, and political philosophy to the theory of fiction.  He is currently writing a book on sovereignty and the concept of anachronism.

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KhannaProfessor Ranjana
Dates: 11 July 2011 to 11 August 2011
Research Project: Asylum: The Concept and the Practic
 
Professor Ranjana Khanna, English & Wom¬en’s Studies, Duke University, USA. Professor Khanna works on Anglo- and Francophone Postcolonial theory and literature, Psychoanalysis, and Feminist theory. She has published articles on transna¬tional feminism, psychoanalysis, autobiography, post¬colonial agency, multiculturalism in an international context, postcolonial Joyce, Area Studies and Women’s Studies, and Algerian film. She is the author of Dark Continents: Psychoanalysis and Colonialism (2003) and Algeria Cuts: Women and Representation 1830 to the present (2008). Her current book project is entitled “Asy¬lum: The Concept and the Practice.”
 

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Riello, A/Professor Giorgio
Dates: 10 July 2011 to 11 September 2011
Research Project: Global Textiles: Material Culture and fashion in the Modern World

Giorgio Riello is Associate Professor in Global History and Culture at the University of Warwick, UK  and taught previously at the London School of Economics (2004-06) and the Royal College of Art/ Victoria and Albert Museum (2003-04). He completed his PhD in History at University College London in 2002 and has a degree in Business Studies from the University of Venice, Ca’ Foscari.

Giorgio is the recipient of several major fellowships and prizes including Philip Leverhulme Prize, the Stanford Humanities Center fellowship, and the Newcomen Business History Prize. His particular interests are directed towards issues of ‘material life and economic development’ and the relationship between consumption and production. His current research focuses on changes in consumer demand and their impact on the spheres of production and material culture, with specific reference to textiles and clothing.

He has published more than 30 articles and papers and is the author of A Foot in the Past (Oxford 2006). He has also edited and co-written eight books among which Shoes (Berg 2006) and The Fashion History Reader (Routledge 2010) (both with Peter McNeil); The Spinning World: A Global History of Cotton Textiles, 1250-1850 (Oxford 2009) (with Prasannan Parthasarathi); How India Clothed the World: The World of South Asian Textiles, 1500-1850 (Brill 2009) (with Tirthankar Roy); and Global Design History (Routledge 2011) (with Glenn Adamson and Sarah Teastley).

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Potter, Dr Matthew
Dates: 4 July 2011 to 14 September 2011
Research Project: The Contribution of Germanic Settlers to Visual Culture in Australia, 1850-1950.

Matthew Potter researches the history of British visual culture in the period 1850-1950 with particular reference to international exchanges within the British world and the role of foreign nations in the creation of various British national identities.  His work engages with imperial and cultural historical discourses in order to explore hybridised forms of cultural production, and looks particularly at such developments in the realms of art critical and collecting practices.  His previous work has focused on two distinct areas: German cultural influences on British art (e.g. The Inspirational Genius of Germany: British Art and Germanism, 1850-1939 (Manchester University Press: Forthcoming 2011); and imperial art debates (e.g. ‘British Art and Empire: Holman Hunt’s The Light of the World reflected in the mirror of the colonial press,’ Media History (volume 13, no. 1 (April 2007)), pp. 1-23).  Matthew's ANU Visiting Fellowship will afford him the opportunity to combine these two areas of interest in exploring the effect of German migrants, as non-British settlers, on the creation of the alternative 'Britishness' of Australian visual culture.  Matthew lectures in the Department of the History of Art and Film at the University of Leicester in the UK.

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McLean, Dr Thomas
Dates: 22 August 2011 to 14 November 2011
Research Project: Citizens of the World: A Critical Biography of the Porter Family

Thomas McLean is a lecturer in nineteenth-century British and American literature at the University of Otago in New Zealand. He is the editor of Further Letters of Joanna Baillie (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2010) and is currently completing The Other East and Nineteenth-Century British Literature: Imagining Poland and the Russian Empire (under contract with Palgrave Macmillan for 2011). His articles have appeared in The Wordsworth Circle, Keats-Shelley Journal, Victorian Poetry, and Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies. While at the Humanities Research Centre, he will be working on a critical biography of the nineteenth-century British novelists Jane and Anna Maria Porter and their brother, the artist, traveler and diplomat Sir Robert Ker Porter.

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Fox, Dr Jo
Dates: 1 September 2011 to 24 November 2011
Research Project: Global Identities and the Documentary Form: John Grierson and International Film

Katrina O'Loughlin

Jo Fox is Professor of Modern History at Durham University, UK. She is a  specialist in the history of film and propaganda in twentieth-century Europe. She has published on the cinematic cultures of Britain and Germany during the Second World War, exploring the connections between film, propaganda and popular opinion. She is currently researching the life, career and ideas of the 'Father of Documentary', John Grierson, assessing his influence on early film, propaganda, international film education, and global cultures. She is member of the Council for the International Association for Media and History and a National Teaching Fellow (2007).

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O'Loughlin, Dr Katrina
Dates: 26 September 2011 to 14 November 2011
Research Project: Eighteenth-century cosmopolitanisms: affiliation, identity and cultural exchange

Katrina O'Loughlin

Having recently completed her doctorate at the University of Melbourne (2009), Katrina O’Loughlin has joined the University of Western Australia as an Honorary Research Fellow. Her research interests include eighteenth-century English literary and material cultures with a focus on women’s writing, travel, and the representation of subjectivity and cultural difference. She has published on women's travel, writing, gender and identity, and taught in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. Current projects include the development of her doctoral research for publication, and a proposed edition of two female-authored Russian travel narratives of the 1730's. She is also pursuing new research in the area of eighteenth-century cosmopolitanisms, with a focus on correspondence, cultural exchange and intellectual sociability in the second half of the century.

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Updated: 7 January 2012/ Responsible Officer:  Head, HRC / Page Contact:  HRC administration