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The Australian National University

2010 Visiting fellows

A/Professor Shirley LIM, Department of History, SUNY Stony Brook, USA. Imaging Race and Gender in Australia: Anna May Wong. (25 January 2010 to 19 April 2010). Email: sjlim@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Dr Matthew CHRISTENSEN, Department of English, University of Texas, USA. Rebellious Histories: The Amistad Slave Rebellion, Black Transnationalism, and Modernity in Sierra Leone and the United States. (25 January 2010 to 19 April 2010). Email: mchriste@utpa.edu

Professor Liz WELLS, Faculty of Arts, University of Plymouth, UK. Land, Landscape and Identity. (27 January 2010 to 19 April 2010). Email: liz.wells@plymouth.ac.uk

Professor Diana BRYDON, St John's College, Department of English, Film and Theatre, University of Manitoba, Canada. Home in National and Global Imaginaries. (1 February 2010 to 23 April 2010). Email: brydond@cc.umanitoba.ca

Professor Wendy WEBSTER, Education and Social Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, UK. Englishness and Europe, 1939-75. (15 February 2010 - 7 May 2010). Email: wwebster@uclan.ac.uk

Jackie MENZIES, Asian Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales. The Satiricla Gaze in India, 18th Century and later. (15 February 2010 to 3 may 2010 plus 12-19 July 2010). Email: jackiem@ag.nsw.gov.au

Professor Paula HAMILTON, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney. Biography and the senses: putting the visual into perspective. (8 March 2010 - 31 May 2010). Email: paula.hamilton@uts.edu.au

Professor Stephen CLANCY, Art History, Ithana College, USA. Visualizing the Self and Others: Muslins, Jews, and Christians in Medieval Iberia. (15 March 2010 to 7 June 2010). Email: clancy@ithaca.edu

Dr Luke GARTLAN, School of Art History, University of St Andrews, UK. Photographic Portraiture in Meiji Japan: New Practices, Customers, and Representations. (14 June 2010 to 5 September 2010). Email: lg321@st-andrews.ac.uk

Dr Elizabeth CORY-PEARCE, Sainsbury Research Unit for the Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, University of East Anglia. Form, Surface and Effect: Maori Portraiture in Cross-cultural Perspective. (28 June 2010 to 17 September 2010). Email: e.cory-pearce@uea.ac.uk

Dr Karen GREENE, Joint HRC/Freilich Fellow, Postdoctoral Associate at The Center for Historical Analysis at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, USA. Gift of Abandonment: The Value of 'Children' and the Poetics and Politics of Adoption in 21st Century Cambodia. (10 July 2010 to 21 August 2010). Email: greenejobs@gmail.com

Dr Petra KUPPERS, Department of English, University of Michigan, USA. Disability Representation in Australia: Imaging Disability Culture. (6 September 2010 to 16 November 2010). Email: petra@umich.edu

Dr Senay KARA, Department of English, University of Istanbul, Turkey. Deconstructing (discourses of) abuse/exploitation. (4 October 2010 to 16 November 2010). Email: senay@istanbul.edu.tr

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Visiting Fellows Biographies

Lim, Professor Shirley
Dates: 25 January 2010 to 19 April 2010
Research Project: Imaging Race and Gender in Australia: Anna May Wong

Shirley LimShirley Jennifer Lim is Associate Professor of History and affiliate faculty in Women’s Studies, Africana Studies, and Cinema and Cultural Studies at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The author of A Feeling of Belonging: Asian American Women’s Public Culture, 1930-1960 (NYU 2006), she is currently working on a book-length manuscript entitled “Performing the Modern: Anna May Wong and Josephine Baker.”

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Christensen, Dr Matthew
Dates: 25 January 2010 to 19 April 2010
Research Project: Rebellious Histories: The Amistad Slave Rebellion, Black Transnationalism, and Modernity in Sierra Leone and the United States

Matthew ChristensenMatthew Christensen is currently an assistant professor of English at the University of Texas-Pan American, located on the U.S.-Mexico border, where teaches African, postcolonial, and comparative world literature.  He is completing his first book, Rebellious Histories: The Amistad Slave Rebellion, Black Transnationalism, and Modernity in Sierra Leone and the United States, which examines the cultural afterlives of the 1839 shipboard rebellion as it has been deployed to confront the legacies of Atlantic capitalism.

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Wells, Professor Liz
Dates: 27 January 2010 to 19 April 2010
Research Project: Land, Landscape and Identity

Liz Wells

Liz Wells writes and lectures on photographic practices. She is editor of The Photography Reader, 2003 and of Photography: A Critical Introduction, 2009, 4th ed.; also co-editor of photographies, Routledge journals.

Exhibitions as curator include Uneasy Spaces, an exhibition of work by 19 British-based artists working in photography and photo-video (New York, Sept - Nov. 2006) and Facing East, Contemporary Landscape Photography from Baltic Areas (UK tour 2004 - 2007). Her book, Land Matters: Landscape Photography, Culture and Identity, is due publication 2010. Other publications on landscape include Liz Wells, Kate Newton and Catherine Fehily, eds., Shifting Horizons, Women’s Landscape Photography Now, 2000.

She is Professor in Photographic Culture, Faculty of Arts, University of Plymouth, UK, and convenes the research group for Land/Water and the Visual Arts. www.landwater-research

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Brydon, Professor Diana
Dates: 1 February 2010 to 23 April 2010
Research Project: Home in National and Global Imaginaries

Diana BrydonDiana Brydon is Canada Research Chair in Globalization and Cultural Studies and Director of the Centre for Globalization and Cultural Studies at the University of Manitoba. She has published books on Christina Stead and Timothy Findley, edited Postcolonialism: Critical Concepts in Literary and Cultural Studies and co-edited Shakespeare in Canada and Renegotiating Community: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Global Contexts. She currently serves as a member of the international convening group for a project on “Building Global Democracy” (www.buildingglobaldemocracy.org) and is conducting research on home in global and national imaginaries and new literacies in cross-cultural contexts.

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Webster, Professor Wendy
Dates: 15 February to 7 May 2010
Research Project: Englishness and Europe, 1935-1973

Wendy WebsterWendy Webster’s current project on Englishness and Europe has been supported by a Leverhulme Research Fellowship.

Her writing, initially mainly in journalism, led to the publication of Not A Man To Match Her: The Marketing of a Prime Minister (Women’s Press, 1990). Since she turned to academic work, she has published widely on questions of imperialism, race, ethnicity, gender, migration and national identity, in contemporary British history including Imagining Home: Gender, ‘Race’, and National Identity (UCL Press, 1998) and Englishness and Empire, 1939-1965 (Oxford University Press, 2005) which was awarded the International Association for Media and History prize for best work in the field in 2006. Her latest book, co-edited with Louise Ryan is Gendering Migration: Masculinity, Femininity and Ethnicity in Post-war Britain (Ashgate, 2008). For further information on her current project and her publications, see
http://www.uclan.ac.uk/ahss/education_social_sciences/history/wendy_webster.php

She is Professor Emerita of Contemporary British History at the University of Central Lancashire, UK.

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Menzies, Jackie Dates: 15 February 2010 to 3 may 2010 plus 12-19 July 2010
Research Project:The Satiricla Gaze in India, 18th Century and later

Jackie MenziesJackie Menzies, a graduate of the University of Sydney, has been responsible for the development of the Asian collections at the Art Gallery of New South Wales since her appointment in 1980. She has been responsible for many publications relating to the collections, and overseen two expansions of the Asian galleries (one in 1990; then most recently the upstairs Asian ‘pavilion’ in 2003). The 352 page book 'The Asian Collections' (2003), edited by her, was awarded 'Best Book of the Year' 2003 by the Power Institute and the Association of Art Historians of Australia and New Zealand. Ms Menzies has been the recipient of many grants, including two Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage grants: one with the University of Sydney, another with the University of Western Sydney, and an AMCAI (Art Museum Collections Accessibility Initiative) grant from the Ian Potter Foundation (2001-2003) to research audience development.

Ms Menzies has curated/organised many exhibitions – large and small - and edited/ contributed to many catalogues. Selected major Asian exhibitions include 'Imperial China' (1992), 'Sacred Images of Sri Lanka'(1994), 'INDIA: Dancing to the Flute' (1997), 'MODERN BOY, MODERN GIRL, Modernity in Japanese Art 1910-1935' (1998), 'BUDDHA, Radiant Awakening' (2001), and ‘GODDESS, Divine Energy’ (2006). The catalogue for GODDESS was awarded the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ) 2007 prize for best large catalogue with citation (in part) ‘…this catalogue, and the exhibition that accompanied it, are outstanding examples of global scholarly endeavour of the highest international standard’.

She has been a Director of VisAsia (the Australian Institute of Asian Art and Culture) since 2000, and was President of The Asian Arts Society of Australia (TAASA) 1993-2000 (Vice-President 1991-93). She was a recipient of a Centenary Medal of the Commonwealth of Australia in 2003, and in 2008 was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia for ‘the study, preservation and promotion of Asian art in Australia..’

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Hamilton, Professor Paula
Dates: 8 March 2010 to 31 May 2010
Research Project:Biography and the senses: putting the visual into perspective

Paula HamiltonPaula Hamilton is Associate Professor of History at the University of Technology in Sydney. Her specialist areas of research include cultural history and memory studies, especially individual and public memory; oral history and biography. She is also the Director of the Australian Centre for Public History and has worked in a range of projects with museums, heritage agencies and community organisations. Her most recent publications are (co-edited with Linda Shopes) Oral History and Public Memories, Temple University Press, 2008 and (with Paul Ashton) the forthcoming History at the Crossroads: Australians and the Past, to be published by Halstead press in 2010.

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Clancy, Professor Stephen
Dates: 15 March 2010 to 7 June 2010
Research Project: Visualizing the Self and Others: Muslins, Jews, and Christians in Medieval Iberia

Stephen ClancyStephen Clancy is Professor and Chair of the Art History department at Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York.  He began his professional life as a lawyer, before deciding to hang up his “law suits” to don the robes of academia.  Professor Clancy teaches the history of Ancient, Medieval, and Northern Renaissance art and architecture, as well as general courses on visual culture and the rhetoric of images.  Professor Clancy has published and presented extensively on the French fifteenth-century artist Jean Fouquet, Middle Byzantine ivory carving, and the northern French illuminator and panel painter Simon Marmion; his work on Marmion was supported by Fulbright Scholar and American Philosophical Society Awards in Belgium in 1995-96.  His interest in infusing technology into the humanities led him to develop an interactive architectural visualization project entitled "The Virtual Chartres Cathedral" (http://www.ithaca.edu/chartres), created with the aid of grants from the Hewlett and Keck foundations, and a six-month collaboration with Prof. Bharat Dave of the University of Melbourne. For a number of years he has also served as a lecturer and study leader on educational tours sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History. His current research project takes a trans-cultural approach to exploring specific ways in which Islamic, Christian, and Jewish cultures of medieval Iberia “[came] to know themselves and make sense of their relations with others” (Thomas Glick, “Convivencia: An Introductory Note,” Convivencia: Muslims, Jews, and Christians in Medieval Spain (New York, 1992), 1) by reacting inventively – in a continual series of visual responses and counter-response – when confronted with cultural traditions very different from their own. He is particularly interested in the intersection between resistance and appropriation in medieval Iberian visual culture, including post-medieval appropriations of rejected past identities. This research project in part grew out of extensive preparatory investigations for a course he developed entitled “Muslims, Jews, and Christians in Medieval Iberia,” which serves both the Muslim Studies and Jewish Studies programs at Ithaca College.

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Gartlan, Dr Luke
Dates: 14 June 2010 to 6 September 2010
Research Project: Photographic Portraiture in Meiji Japan: New Practices, Customers, and Representations

Luke GartlanLuke Gartlan is Lecturer in the School of Art History at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, where he teaches modules on the history of photography and colonial-era visual culture. He has held research fellowships at the University of Vienna (2004-05) and Nihon University, Tokyo (2005-07), and has contributed catalogue essays for the National Gallery of Victoria and the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography. Luke has published articles in Visual Resources, Early Popular Visual Culture, and The La Trobe Journal, and recently guest edited a special issue on photography in nineteenth-century Japan for History of Photography (May 2009). Currently he is working on a monograph on the aristocratic photographer Baron Raimund von Stillfried and his role as a cultural mediator and interpreter of Japanese culture. For more information see http://www-ah.st-andrews.ac.uk/staff/gartlan.html

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Cory-Pearce, Dr Elizabeth
Dates: 28 June 2010 to 17 September 2010
Research Project: Form, Surface and Effect: Maori portraiturein cross-cultural perspective

Elizabeth Cory-Pearce is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Sainsbury Research Unit for the Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas at the University of East Anglia in Britain. She is currently writing up research on Maori ceremonial exchanges with British aristocracy in late nineteenth and early twentieth century New Zealand. These reveal the politics of colonial encounter and shed light on the ways in which Maori deployed new ideas, materials and practices to pursue particular ends. Analysis of these and other exchanges occurring in Rotorua as a result of the region’s tourism industry forms the crux of her research. Based on fieldwork and the analysis of collections, Elizabeth is working on a monograph and articles that uncover the dynamics of cross-cultural appropriation in New Zealand, in comparison with similar settler-colonial milieu. Case studies include clothing, photography and art. Elizabeth has held lecturing posts at the University of Sussex, the University of Oxford and University College London where she lectured on Anthropology; Ethnographic Film; Anthropology of Art; Material Anthropology; and Museum Studies. Her publications include essays in the Association of Social Anthropology’s Monograph Creativity and Cultural Improvisation (Berg 2007); The Art of Clothing (UCL Press 2005); and the Journal of Museum Ethnography (2007).  

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Greene, Dr Karen
Dates: 10 July 2010 to 21 August 2010
Research Project: Gift of Abandonment: The Value of 'Children' and the Poetics and Politics of Adoption in 21st Century Cambodia

karen GreeneKaren Greene holds an MA from the University of California, Berkeley in Folklore and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley/UCSF in Medical Anthropology. Her Master's thesis explored the transnational circulation and transformation of familiar courtship themes in the narratives of Cambodian refugee parents using films and tales to teach their daughters to be good Cambodian women, and in the daughters' self-making efforts to be both good Cambodians and good Americans. Karen's doctoral work followed the transformation of ethical discourse in the opposite directions. She interrogated human rights pedagogy, the transformation of ways of caring and the making of Cambodian young people into children-with-rights. Questions of governance, personhood, the vibrancy of young people, and the ontological stakes in the circulation of persons, ideas, and things drive her work, and shape in her research questions.

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Kuppers, Dr Petra
Dates: 6 September 2010 to 16 November 2010
Research Project: Disability Representation in Australia: Imaging Disability Culture

Petra KuppersPetra Kuppers is the Artistic Director of The Olimpias (www.olimpias.org), and Associate Professor of English, Women's Studies and Theatre and Dance at the University of Michigan. Her books include Disability and Contemporary Performance: Bodies on Edge (Routledge, 2003), The Scar of Visibility: Medical Performances and Contemporary Art (Minnesota, 2007), Community Performance: An Introduction (Routledge, 2007), and the co-authored poetry collection, with Neil Marcus, Cripple Poetics (Homofactus Press, 2008).

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Kara, Dr Senay
Dates: 4 October 2010 to 16 November 2010
Research Project: Deconstructing (discourses of) abuse/exploitation

Senay Kara is assistant professor of English at the University of Istanbul, Turkey. She holds an MA (thesis: Angela Carter's Rewriting of Both Fact and Fiction or Putting New Wine in Old Bottles to Make Them Explode', 2000) and a PhD (thesis: .J. M. C'oetzee's Foe Writing Back to Canonical Pre-texts, 2007) from the University of Istanbul. She was visiting scholar at the Leeds Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, UK (2006, 2010). She specializes in, teaching, and has published on contemporary (postmodern, poststructuralist) literary/cultural theories and criticism, contemporary literatures, postcolonial studies, political ([neo/post]Marxist) theories, gender studies, ecocriticism, interdisciplinary and cultural studies. Her current research is on "(post)colonial child migration/transportation/removal and the resultant (life )narratives in various representational forms" (which constitutes a section of her project which, for now, has been broadly entitled "Deconstructing (discourses of) abuse/exploitation" and which consists of critical analyses of -racial, class, gender, environmental, representational, etc.- inequality, discrimination, injustice, oppression, and violence as they are reflected on various works of literature/art).

Updated: 12 September 2011/ Responsible Officer:  Head, HRC / Page Contact:  HRC administration